Purebred French alpines, french goats, alpines for sale, french alpines for sale, kid goats for sale, kid goats, cheesemaking, goat bells, goat soaps, milking goats, buck service, Purebred French Alpine Dairy Goats
Our French Alpines . . . . 
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For more information please contact us at

KUNIC RANCH
Kunic Family

(805) 467-3510
Remember, we offer 24/7 "Tech support"with every animal sale.
You won't be left "in the dark" with questions about your new animal's care;  and you are encouraged to call ANY time if you have a question or problem; we want to see you succeed as we have. We care about our animals AND our customers.
Have to bottle feed a new baby kid, calf, colt or piglet?  We will have available fresh goat milk for this purpose available at $2.50 per quart, ranch pick up or we can arrange delivery elsewhere that fits everyone's schedule. 


 With the commercial corruption and GMO-contamination of America's food supply today, it is becoming ever apparent that a sound knowledge of what we are eating is of utmost importance.  We encourage people to be as locally sustainable as possible, and with the huge variety of products possible from your milk, it is a great place to start. 

With several does, it is possible to make your entire year's supply of cheddar or other hard, aged cheeses; enjoy fresh cheeses like Feta and Chevre regularly, and yogurt, kefir or ice cream whenever you wish and on short order.  You can  make any "cow" cheese  out of your goat milk, including Romano and Parmesan.  And let's not forget goat's milk soap, easy to make a year's supply in just several batches, no matter how much soap you use!  Extra buck kids can be sold or used like lamb.

 Our goats produce milk that is sweet and wholesome, absolutely no "goaty" flavor or after taste.  Besides good breeding, scrupulous cleanliness and milk handling go together for great tasting milk that is safe and your entire family will appreciate and enjoy.  And note: do not feed your milking doe within two hours of milking or there may be a slight taste of the feed she consumed, especially if she ate any strong tasting weeds or got into some onions.

 We are one of the very few pure French Alpine herds left in the United States today.   All our dairy goats are ADGA registered Purebred French Alpines.  Today, we continue to breed for an elegant, correct French doe who produces milk ideal for the production of the cheeses and other dairy products we make and enjoy.  


  

Starting in 4H,  Deborah has been raising purebred French Alpine dairy goats since the 1970's.  Later on, her children, Serena and Seth had Alpines in 4-H, and even though no one is in 4-H any longer, the French Alpines endure. 

 These days, with all our technology and "time saving" gadgets we find ourselves busier than ever.    Many people desiring a superior raw  milk supply would like to have their own  milk goat but are discouraged by the time requirements for twice daily milking. Well folks, I'm right there with you.  Having to milk goats twice a day isn't going to happen, and hasn't for quite some time.   I don't like to waste food so for me and many others, a doe which gives 1/2 to 1 gallon a day is plenty.  If you happen to miss a day on occasion, she will forgive you and be real glad for the next milking.  In addition, I don't like to be chained to the milk stand for ten minutes while I milk two gallons of milk (that's 16 lbs) out of a huge doe.  And remember, this milk comes daily so it needs to have a use or it's a lot of work for absolutely nothing.  By the same token, I don't want to milk a miniature goat with tiny teats for a tiny amount of milk.  

​So through the years, we have bred for a correctly built, moderately sized doe with an exceptionally well attached udder which is easy and fast to milk out.  Moderate sized goats are more feed efficient and easier to handle than a huge doe.

​At kidding time we have a "happy medium" management system.  The does are with their kids for the first few weeks, then they go out to graze during the day while the kids stay in the kid pen, returning to be with them all night.  This way, the  does will "build an udder" and can be milked if a supply is needed for a cheese batch before returning to their kids, or they can be nursed out by their kids over the night.  Generally the kids will keep up with draining the doe, but if she only has a single kid and/or is a higher producer, it is easy enough to milk her once a day.

AND, French Alpines are NOT to be confused with American Alpines!  French Alpines are purebred and all descend from the original importations from France early in the last century.  They are not mixed with other breeds as are American Alpines and should not be confused with them.  The French Alpines  are typically slightly smaller in stature, with their distinctive erect, tipped-up-at-the-tip  ears.  They are productive, hardy, quiet and extremely elegant.  Their milk is delicious and well suited for all uses.  They are the ideal family goat.

​Goats are also a benefit to gardeners and anyone wishing sustainability; their composted manure feeds all plants and goats are excellent weeders and consumers of extra garden produce and brush and will even "recycle" eat your old Christmas tree as well (leaving the trunk for firewood).  If your milkers graze poison oak or poison ivy, after consuming their milk for several months you will be bullet -proof to any skin irritation of those plants.  I know; when my does grazed poison oak after a while I could sleep in the stuff with no reaction what so ever.  So read on and discover a new way to wholesome food and independence.......